Scratch Golfer

Scratch Golfer

Mark Wainfor, a PGA qualified pro golfer since 1989, has up to 20 years as a PGA Golf Professional to his name. He’ll share his top golf tips and experiences with you here

The Three Oldest Golf Courses in Scotland

Back To The Future

Golfer Flying BHi everybody! The Open Championship is the oldest and most prestigious golf tournament in the world. Between 1860 (the first Open) and 1890 only three golf courses were used to host the event. These courses can still be played today! In this blog we take a look inside their history.

Prestwick Golf Club

Prestwick is the birthplace of the Open Championship. First played in 1860, the winner was Willie Park, his prize, £25 and a Morocco leather belt with silver clasps. This famous belt was also won 4 times by Old Tom Morris and 3 Times in succession by Young Tom Morris, who subsequently became owner of the prized belt.
Originally a 12-hole course, it was extended in 1883 to 18-holes. The Prestwick links has not changed much over the years and is known for the many blind shots golfers have to hit to the greens, seven of which are still the originals.

Musselburgh Golf Club

Musselburgh Links is generally recognised as the oldest golf course in the world. There is documented evidence that golf was played there in 1672, and it is said that Mary, Queen of Scots played the links in 1567.

The Open Championship was first held here in 1874 and was selected because it was used by the prestigious Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers. The course still has its original 9-holes and is surrounded by Musselburgh Racecourse.

St Andrews-The Old Course

Considered the "home of golf," St. Andrews has hosted The Open Championship more times than any other venue. Golf has being played on the St. Andrews links for over 600 years. The Old Course itself was established around the 1870s.

St. Andrews is famous for the large double greens and 112 pot bunkers. The "Road Hole" and Swilcan Bridge are icons in the golfing world. 

Golfer Flying Blue

Links Golf Course Explained

The term "Links" is typically associated with coastal golf courses and is the oldest style of course. Playing on a links golf course is considerably different from playing on other types of courses.  The challenges of links golf fall into two categories: Firstly the nature of the courses themselves, which tend to be characterised by uneven fairways, thick rough and small deep pot bunkers, and secondly, due to their coastal location and lack of trees, many links courses are frequently very windy. The Open Championship is always played on links courses.

Have you ever played any of these golf courses? Please share with us on FB Facebook. 

Mark's next blog looks at Jack Nicklaus in part 4 of his series “The Seven Ages Of The Golf Swing” Until then read about:

 

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